Edgar Marsalla is my hero

From Chapter 3, The Catcher in the Rye:

“Where I lived at Pencey, I lived in the Ossenburger Memorial Wing of the new dorms.  It was only for juniors and seniors.  I was a junior.  My roommate was a senior.  It was named after this guy Ossenburger that went to Pencey.  He made a pot of dough in the undertaking business after he got out of Pencey.  What he did, he started these undertaking parlors all over the country that you could get members of your family buried for about five bucks apiece.  You should see old Ossenburger.  He probably just shoves them in a sack and dumps them in the river.

Anyway, he gave Pencey a pile of dough, and they named our wing after him.  The first football game of the year, he came up to school in this big goddam Cadillac, and we all had to stand up in the grandstand and give him a locomotive – that's a cheer.  Then, the next morning, in chapel, he made a speech that lasted about ten hours.  He started off with about fifty corny jokes, just to show us what a regular guy he was.  Very big deal.  Then he started telling us how he was never ashamed, when he was in some kind of trouble or something, to get right down on his knees and pray to God.  He told us we should always pray to God – talk to Him and all – wherever we were.  He told us we ought to think of Jesus as our buddy and all.  He said he talked to Jesus all the time.  Even when he was driving his car.  That killed me.  I can just see the big phony bastard shifting into first gear and asking Jesus to send him a few more stiffs.

The only good part of his speech was right in the middle of it.  He was telling us all about what a swell guy he was, what a hot-shot and all, then all of a sudden this guy sitting in the row in front of me, Edgar Marsalla, laid this terrific fart.  It was a very crude thing to do, in chapel and all, but it was also quite amusing.  Old Marsalla.  He damn near blew the roof off.  Hardly anybody laughed out loud, and old Ossenburger made out like he didn't even hear it, but old Thurmer, the headmaster, was sitting right next to him on the rostrum and all, and you could tell he heard it.  Boy, was he sore.

He didn't say anything then, but the next night he made us have compulsory study hall in the academic building and he came up and made a speech.  He said that the boy that had created the disturbance in chapel wasn't fit to go to Pencey.  We tried to get old Marsalla to rip off another one, right while old Thurmer was making his speech, but he wasn't in the right mood.  Anyway, that's where I lived at Pencey.  Old Ossenburger Memorial Wing, in the new dorms.”

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Note: I added three paragraph breaks, to prevent this quote from being a single, large block of text (as it appears in the book).